Gender Differences in Younger Heart Attack Survivors

Thanks to greater awareness and high tech interventions, along with treatment of important risk factors like hypertension, diabetes, and high cholesterol, heart attack deaths have dropped substantially over the past 15 years. But despite the impressive gains in prevention and treatment, younger women continue to die from heart disease at a higher than expected rate.  The reasons are varied and complex, but a recent Canadian study sheds some light on the subject. Researchers at the University of British Columbia found that following a heart attack, only 65% of women age 55 and younger took all the meds considered appropriate for their condition, compared to 75% of men in the same age group.

In an interview with DailyRx reporter Emily Giunta, I pointed out that “women often minimize their symptoms, or convince themselves and others that everything is OK when in fact it is not. As a result, they may be less inclined to fill prescriptions for medication after a heart attack.”

It is also possible that doctors are reluctant to prescribe certain drugs for women due to concerns about possible side effects. For instance, some heart drugs should not be prescribed if a woman is pregnant or likely to become pregnant. That’s an important discussion for a woman of child-bearing age to have with her cardiologist.

In concluding the interview, I told Giunta that “Heart disease kills more women than all causes of cancer combined, including breast cancer, yet it tends to be underplayed in the press and popular media. Women tend to get to the hospital hours later into a heart attack than do men. It’s been shown that part of the reason for this difference is due to the role the spouse plays in recognizing the importance of the symptoms. And since at least 75 percent of heart disease is preventable in the first place, it’s critical that the message gets out loud and clear to women, their families and their physicians.”

For more on this study, click the link below.

Source: Gender Differences in Heart Attack Survivors | RxWiki