Heart Attacks Rising in Younger Women

Many people still think of heart attack as a disease of older men, but the truth is that while heart disease is more likely to strike men earlier in life than women, over 30,000 women under the age of 55 suffer a heart attack in the U.S. every year. A new study spearheaded by researchers from Yale University evaluated over 230,000 separate heart attack hospitalizations for men and women ages 30-54, in an attempt to discover differences, similarities, and trends over time. The good news? More people, regardless of gender, are surviving their heart attacks. The bad news? Over the past 10 years, heart attack rates have risen slightly in women and heart attack-related deaths, while declining, are still more common in younger women than in younger men. The reason? Higher rates of preventable risk factors.

In an interview with DailyRx.com reporter Nancy Maleki, I explained: “It’s disheartening to learn that in this age group, risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes have increased over the past 10 years, despite the fact that in many cases these conditions can be avoided simply by choosing a healthier diet, exercising, and maintaining a safe body weight.”

“Women often have multiple roles, including breadwinner, mother and caregiver, and it’s easy to think that with so many pressing needs, you can put off taking care of yourself for another day. It’s time that women realize that the consequences of ignoring your health can be devastating and sometimes irreversible.”

To learn more about the study and its implications, click on the link to the article on DailyRx.com.

 

Women Died of Heart Attack More Than Men | dailyRx.